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Corporate Culture

Why putting your employees at the centre of your company’s decision-making works

There was a time where many believed that the only reason for business to exist was to maximise shareholder value. According to this belief, the interest of shareholders reigned supreme while the interests of other stakeholders were subordinated to this supreme interest. Milton Friedman, the Nobel Prize-winning economist, strongly advocated that the only responsibility of business is to its shareholders, which the financial markets translated into its short–term share prize. Based on this thinking, many companies adopted the habit of defining vision solely from a shareholder perspective. One could pose the question: does a vision matter?

There was a time where many believed that the only reason for business to exist was to maximise shareholder value. According to this belief, the interest of shareholders reigned supreme while the interests of other stakeholders were subordinated to this supreme interest. Milton Friedman, the Nobel Prize-winning economist, strongly advocated that the only responsibility of business is to its shareholders, which the financial markets translated into its short–term share prize. Based on this thinking, many companies adopted the habit of defining vision solely from a shareholder perspective. One could pose the question: does a vision matter?

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Green buildings are good for business

While the jury is still out on if investing in environmentally friendly buildings can save costs and boost employee productivity (and so make employee management easier), leading employers across the world appear to have already made up their minds on the matter. These organisations are investing in green buildings and work spaces because they know it’s good for productivity.

While the jury is still out on if investing in environmentally friendly buildings can save costs and boost employee productivity (and so make employee management easier), leading employers across the world appear to have already made up their minds on the matter. These organisations are investing in green buildings and work spaces because they know it's good for productivity.

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Ethics is not just about corruption and compliance

Managing misconduct is often described as 'a fight', be it against corruption, bribery, fraud or a range of other unethical and illegal behaviours. This illustrates that looking to eliminate, or even reduce, misconduct isn't an easy task: it can feel like an ongoing battle. However, this can lead to a major imbalance when organisations focus virtually all their attention in the field of workplace ethics on curbing misconduct. While this focus is vital, it isn't enough.

Managing misconduct is often described as 'a fight'. This illustrates that looking to eliminate, or even reduce, misconduct isn't an easy task: it can feel like an ongoing battle. However, this can lead to a major imbalance when organisations focus virtually all their attention in the field of workplace ethics on curbing misconduct. While this focus is vital, it isn't enough.

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How workplace psychopaths become CEOs (part 1) – Introduction

This article is part 3 of 10 in the series about psychopaths and sociopaths in the workplace.

The short answer to this article's title is that we're responsible. We allow workplace psychopaths to get into positions of power. To understand this, we need to examine the outcome as we would any other event. That means exploring the situation: the conditions under which this could occur; flow: the timing and trends of events preceding this outcome; people: what personalities and culture make fertile ground for this occurrence and individuals: how our interactions with psychopaths allow them to advance.

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19 Ways to identify workplace psychopaths

This entry is part 2 of 10 in the series about psychopaths and sociopaths in the workplace. (Follow this link to read the first instalment).

Psychopaths work to amass their power – workplace psychopaths included. Emotion is not in the equation. This means they're immune to others' feelings, including their own. They won't hesitate to suffer what might be humiliating to their co-workers as long as it advances their power. This might appear as an unabashed 'yes person' willing to do anything to advance. Consequently, egotists and narcissists - who possess a more emotionally centred self-view - are different in this way. In addition to being an unabashed 'yes man', workplace psychopaths are likely to fulfil a number of other criteria.

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