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Corporate Culture

How can you develop an entrepreneurial workforce?

There's a strong correlation between entrepreneurship and economic growth, as well as a connection between a company's entrepreneurial culture and its bottom line. However, in today's challenging economic climate, entrepreneurship and innovation seems to be elusive for many organisations. How can you integrate an entrepreneurial way of thinking into your corporate culture?

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How digital strategies are changing corporate culture

Corporate culture is a significant consideration for prospective talented employees. People aren’t clamouring to work at a company known for its non-existent sense of humour or lack of employee benefits.  Google’s excellent corporate culture is world renowned, and it’s not too hard to draw a link between that and the more than two million job applications the company receives a year. A recent study by Waseda University found that “corporate culture can have a significant impact on a company's hiring, talent retention and performance”. A great corporate culture fosters engaged, innovative and loyal employees.

Corporate culture is a significant consideration for prospective talented employees. People aren't clamouring to work at a company known for its non-existent sense of humour or lack of employee benefits. Google's excellent corporate culture is world renowned, and it's not too hard to draw a link between that and the more than two million job applications the company receives a year. A recent study by Waseda University found that "corporate culture can have a significant impact on a company's hiring, talent retention and performance". A great corporate culture fosters engaged, innovative and loyal employees.

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Two lessons women at work can learn from men

Women are not getting ahead and statistics report that the percentage of women at work in top positions has stayed relatively static for the past three years. The problem is women at work need to realise that the business world was created by men and so they must play by men's rules. It's sexist and harsh but it's a reality women need to grasp. Women need to stop blaming the glass ceiling for not growing in their careers and start observing the creators of the game.

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The serious matter of games at work

Recent research shows that two-thirds of the world's largest companies will most likely use gamification by the end of the year, and 55% of 18 to 24 year-olds would welcome it. It might be a relatively new concept in the workplace, but you can't ignore those statistics. In addition, many companies are realising the cost savings in human resources, increased productivity, improved morale and better client relationships as a result of it. Gamification can breathe new life into your workforce.

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Let’s welcome millennial women into the workforce

Women are in the spotlight this month, which makes it an appropriate time to consider the aspirations and progress of young women in the workplace. These millennial women, born between 1980 and 1995, form the leadership pipeline for the future. By 2020, they are expected to make up one quarter of the labour force. Currently between 19 and 34 years of age, these women have very different approaches to the world of work compared to their predecessors. It's time the corporate world took notice of them.

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